Champaign-Urbana Community Fab Lab
Champaign-Urbana Community Fab Lab

Intelligent Toaster Project

“May I Just ask one question… would anyone like any toast?” In so far as  
  • most electrical components today are offered as surface mount technology (SMT)
  • fine pitch surface mount components require special care in soldering, to avoid solder bridges (shorts) between leads
  • high pin count SMT devices, and especially four-sided components (PLCCs, quad flat packs, etc.) can suffer from assembly skew if the leads are soldered “sequentially”
  it follows that a bulk reflow mechanism is a desirable resource. Specifically, a device that can  
  1. warm an entire (small) PCB to a target preheat temperature (perhaps 150 F)
  2. rapid heat (“flash”) the top surface of the board to solder reflow temperature (e.g. 400 F) for a controlled amount of time
  which will cause all of the solder joints to melt concurrently. The SMT component(s) will then be free to self-center on the copper lands of the PCB, courtesy of surface tension. Further, as long as the amount of solder (paste) on the board is minimal, the individual puddles of solder should collect on the individual copper lands, and not bridge across them. Also courtesy of surface tension. In commercial facilities, this can be done with hot air, infrared, vapor phase, and convection ovens. Of these, the easiest to fabricate (personally) is the convection oven.   Mission statement Adapt a toaster oven for computer control. Provide temperature sensing and heater element (on/off) control; develop a “temperature profile” editor (software) to allow the user to “draw” a target temperature profile for the oven to follow; develop real-time software to control the oven according to the profile.   First guess at required resources  
  • toaster over
  • PC
  • temperature sensor
  • solid state relay (120V, 1300W switching capability)
  • small PCB to serve as cable connection point (with DB9 serial port connector)
  • (maybe) microcontroller, to sit between the PC and oven, to provide USB interface as well as watch-dog shutdown (failsafe mechanisms(
  Note: the following content belongs on separate pages. However, at this time, I am unable to create visible, persistant content. But as long as I remember the URL to this page, I can keep coming back to it…   9 Dec 2010 Purchased 2nd-hand toaster oven from Twice is Nice, the First Presbyterian Church resale shop on Elm Street, in Urbana.
  • Hamilton Beach model 336. 1300W. $2
Spent 30 minutes with steel wool (and sand paper) removing burnt-on food residue. This unit will characteristically be operated at high temperatures; best to remove organics now…   Test run. 2″x1″ pcb (scrap) with a 0.5″ piece of lead-free solder (wire) on top.
  1. “Baked” until 250F (assuming that the front panel thermostat still works). 5 minutes.
  2. Cranked thermostat to “Broil”. Solder melted with 30 seconds!
  3. Cool down (to the point that I felt was safe for a stranger to touch) took 20 minutes Frown
It may be desirable to position the PCB closer to the top heater element. However, it may also be wise to provide tin-foil “hats” for silicon, to avoid top-browning…   Need for next time:
  • oven mits
  • tongs (needle nose pliers are not adequate)
  • oven thermometer (to check front panel thermostat)
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Discussion on Fab Academy Hosting & Participation for Spring 2011

NOTICE A DISCUSSION ON FAB ACADEMY HOSTING & PARTICIPATION FOR SPRING 2011 AT CHAMPAIGN-URBANA COMMUNITY FAB LAB WILL BE HELD ON THURSDAY DECEMBER 2 @ 5:30 PM THE PROGRAM: http://academy.cba.mit.edu/about/index.html A Fab Academy prep video (Fab Lab videoconference at mcu.cba.mit.edu) is set for 9:00 am Boston time over the polycom next week on Tue Dec 7 – attend if you can! RSVP
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Discussion on Fab Academy Hosting & Participation for Spring 2011

NOTICE A DISCUSSION ON FAB ACADEMY HOSTING & PARTICIPATION FOR SPRING 2011 AT CHAMPAIGN-URBANA COMMUNITY FAB LAB WILL BE HELD ON THURSDAY DECEMBER 2 @ 5:30 PM THE PROGRAM: http://academy.cba.mit.edu/about/index.html A Fab Academy prep video (Fab Lab videoconference at mcu.cba.mit.edu) is set for 9:00 am Boston time over the polycom next week on Tue Dec 7 – attend if you can! RSVP
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Using the Fab Lab Video Conferencing Service from Ubuntu with Ekiga

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Using the Fab Lab Video Conferencing Service from Mac OS X with XMeeting

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In System Programmer (ISP) for Fab Lab

Using AVRISP mkii to program the target (FABISP) board A more detailed tutorial can be found here. Eagle files:FabISP.sch, FabISP.brd, FabISP.lbr, FabLab.dru, Partslist Modela: FabISP.png , FabISPdim.png Software: Firmware.zip, FabModules Making the PCB using the Modela: Install the fab modules. You will need at least 2x4in copper board (FRS1) Set it up as in the picture below (making sure the platform is not moving and the board is taped securely on the Modela stage). Use the 1/64in bit for cutting the traces and 1/16in bit for cutting the board outline (dim). See screen shots below for the Modela settings. Programming the FABISP Download and unzip the firmware.zip files and the development tools for AVR micro-controllers. CrossPack on Mac OS X. Copy avrdude.conf into /usr/local/etc and avrdude into /usr/local/bin WinAVR on Windows avr-gcc, avr-libc, and avrdude packages on Linux. Open the “makefile” using TextEdit and make sure you select the correct oscillator (I used the 12MHz) and correct ISP: F_CPU = 12000000 AVRDUDE = avrdude -c avrisp2 -P usb -p $(DEVICE) — if you are using the AVRISP mkii AVRDUDE = avrdude -c usbtiny -p $(DEVICE) — if you are using the FABISP   Save the file. Open the command window and navigate to the directory where the firmware files were saved. In the command window type:   sudo make clean sudo make hex sudo make fuse sudo make program Once the ATtiny44A is programmed, open the SJ1 solder jumper (disconnect the two pads).
FAB ISP pcb
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Daily Illini: Local Fab Lab gives tools to innovation to Champaign-Urbana

From the article: Community members came together Thursday afternoon for the grand opening of the Champaign-Urbana Community Fab Lab, which aims to inspire innovative thinking in the general population. The lab, which has been open to the public since April, is part of a global network of Fab Labs, which give community members the opportunity to have access to equipment and materials to design and build almost anything they can imagine or want. The local Fab Lab is a joint effort by the University, Parkland College, the Don Moyer Boys and Girls Club and several other community organizations. Neil Gershenfeld, director of The Center for Bits and Atoms at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, developed the first Fab Lab at MIT. In conjunction with the opening event, Gershenfeld spoke about the role of Fab Labs in empowering ordinary people to create technology. Read more: Local Fab Lab gives tools to innovation to Champaign-Urbana
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The News-Gazette: 'Fab Lab' drawing variety of users

From the article: URBANA – Call it a community workshop. Metalworker Dean Rose came to create templates for making bells. University of Illinois freshmen came to put together a 3-D printer. A young mother came to design items for small kids. And youngsters from the Don Moyer Boys and Girls Club came to assemble tin-can robots. All those projects and more were done at the Champaign-Urbana Community Fab Lab, which opened earlier this year at 1301 S. Goodwin Ave., U – in a building just south of the UI’s College of ACES Library. Read more:  ‘Fab Lab’ drawing variety of users
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The News-Gazette: ‘Fab Lab’ drawing variety of users

From the article: URBANA – Call it a community workshop. Metalworker Dean Rose came to create templates for making bells. University of Illinois freshmen came to put together a 3-D printer. A young mother came to design items for small kids. And youngsters from the Don Moyer Boys and Girls Club came to assemble tin-can robots. All those projects and more were done at the Champaign-Urbana Community Fab Lab, which opened earlier this year at 1301 S. Goodwin Ave., U – in a building just south of the UI’s College of ACES Library. Read more:  ‘Fab Lab’ drawing variety of users
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Smile Politely: Designmatters4 and FabLab are almost off and running

From the article: The Champaign-Urbana Community FabLab will formally open on Thursday, November 11, at 3-5 pm in the FabLab, located in the Art Annex 2, 1301 South Goodwin Avenue, Urbana, 61801. This event is open to everyone and will feature hands on activities, welcoming remarks by members of the Lab’s Community Leadership Council, and by Neil Gershenfeld, Director of MIT’s Center for Bits and Atoms and the founder of the global FabLab network. The mission of the Champaign-Urbana Community FabLab is to promote ingenuity, invention and inspiration by introducing students of any age to modern prototyping and fabrication equipment. Our goal is to encourage creativity as well as an interest in architecture, art, computing, engineering, mathematics, science, and technical trades. Community access, at a reasonable cost, builds local capability with global links to the entire FabLab network — enabling personal growth, economic development and cross-cultural understanding. We encourage people to build virtually anything they can imagine. Read more: Designmatters4 and FabLab are almost off and running
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